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Star Rose Quartz Gemstone - GemSelect

So What Exactly Is Star Rose Quartz Gemstone?


Well, Rose quartz is certainly one of the most attractive varieties of quartz and perhaps even the most desirable too. But, when combined with the optical phenomenon of asterism, there is no doubt that Star Rose Quartz tops the Quartz chart.

Rose Quartz owes its distinctly unique soft pink color to the tiny reminents of both titanium and manganese. On rare occasion, a rose quartz specimen will contain small rutile needle inclusions which will give it its optical star-effect. The asterism can be seen under lighting and the level of distinction is dependent on the quality of stone.

Unlike Star Ruby or even Star Sapphire, Rose Quartz will display its asterism or star-like effect under any strong light making this a very attractive stone. Typically, star-like astermism effects can only be seen with rose quartz that has been cut, or otherwise polished speciemens of rose quartz, meaning that it is nearly impossible to distinguish asterism in unpolished rose quartz.  

What is interesting is that because the left and right eyes will view the star-like asterism effect from different angles, our brain concludes that the star is actually located just above the actual rose quartz stone. This is why you may feel a little dizzy or 'drunk' when viewing star rose quartz for too long.

You can watch our video below of a Star Rose Quartz from our collection. This is a very large specimen weighing in at 1,313.00 carats! What a Huge Gemstone!!! http://www.gemselect.com/star-rose-quartz/star-rose-quartz-305251.php




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Natural Unheated White Sapphire from GemSelect

Natural Unheated White Sapphire is rare, and to find them in nice sizes and shapes is even rarer.

Heart Shaped gems are special fancy cuts with nothing but romance and love in mind. They are perfect for couples, friends and siblings. You can wear them as pendants, rings, earrings or bracelets. They make lovely charms fit for anyone.

The great thing about sapphire is its hardness and durability. Their hardness is 9  on Mohs scale, second only to diamond. White sapphire resembles diamond so much that most people cannot tell the difference at all.

You can watch this video and see for yourself:





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Ceylon Blue Sapphire from Sri Lanka | GemSelect

Sapphire from Sri Lanka is of the most coveted sapphire. Among Kashmir and Burma sapphire, it has a very unique blue color that makes it quite different than typically blues found in Australia or even Thailand. It's described as being lighter and brighter, often silky compared to deep inky and dark.

The best sapphires from Sri Lanka can have a cornflower blue that can easily compare to Kashmir and Burmese sapphire.

Although blue is the most famous color for Ceylon Sapphire, other fancy colored sapphires are also found in Sri Lanka such as bright vivid pink, yellow, orange, violet, green and even the rare pink-orange sapphire often referred to as Padparadscha.

After watching the wonderful video below, you can see the color difference of Ceylon Sapphire. This is why it is so special!



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Opal Gemstone - Play of Color - GemSelect

Opal and Play of Color

The color of opal and its play or phenomenon of optical trait is a magnificent thing. Opals are unique because they can display all the spectral colors in an iridescent and moving pattern of yellow, red, green, blue, purple, pink, aqua and any other color imaginable.

The surreal floating movement of color that flashes across the surface of a stone is known as the 'play of color'.

But you may ask, what causes the remarkable colors in opal? Well, the answer is simply the diffraction of light. Very much like a prism refracting white light and produce rainbow-like effects, opals can diffract white light which can give it those amazing opal colors.

See the video and watch the play of color in the wonderful Opal from GemSelect.





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GemSelect's Featured Special - Aussie Boulder Opal

About Australian Boulder Opal from GemSelect

See Details at http://www.gemselect.com/boulder-opal/boulder-opal-296317.php#


Boulder Opal is a highly valued variety of opal. The name was derived from the fact that boulder opal is found embedded into ironstone boulders.

The unique opal typically forms as thin veins within these ironstone boulders, and as a result, most stones are cut to include some of the host ironstone matrix. For this reason, boulder opal is sometimes referred to as 'opal in matrix'.

Boulder opal is especially attractive because of its dark body tone -- which adds vibrancy to its remarkable play of color. Boulder opal also has a higher density because of the ironstone content, and for this reason, can be more durable as well.

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GemSelect Reviews Precision and Native Cut Gemstones

GemSelect Reviews Precision Cut Gemstones and Native Cut Gemstones

Many precious gems, including rubies and sapphires, can be quite rare. In fact, several types of colored gemstones can be rarer than diamond. To add to their scarcity, the percentages of high quality gemstones that are extracted from said gem mines are but a small fraction of the actual deposits made available. Therefore, top grade sapphire, emerald and ruby are quite indeed, exceptionally rare specimens.

Because colored gemstones are so rare, gemstone cutters will attempt at all costs to preserve as much of the rough material when cutting valuable gems. The price per carat of these gems is so high that salvaging an extra 100 milligrams (.50 carat) of weight can make a significant and substantial difference regarding the business’s economics.

However, there are some tradeoffs to be encountered when trying to maximize the yield cut from rough, uncut stone. First off, generally the shape of any finished stone will usually reflect the shape of the rough material. This is the reason why you won't find many round-shaped rubies or sapphires, especially in larger premium sizes. The rough stones tend to yield mainly oval shape finished pieces, with some fancy cushions and pear shapes becoming available. A more serious tradeoff is occasional bad or poor cutting of gems, which can affect the beauty of any gemstone.

Native Cut’ is a term used often and refers to a range of cutting faults that can sometimes be the result of an overeager attempt to maximize the carat weight of a rough stone. The most common seen error is cutting a gemstone with too large off a face with a shallow pavilion, resulting in an undesired phenomenon known as ‘windowing’. A gem with windowing effects has an unfortunate characteristic where it will display an area of diminished color in the center of the gem, meaning some light rays pass directly through the stone rather than reflect back to the eye displaying brilliance.

With colored gemstones, cut is not nearly as important, like it is in the world of diamonds. The most critical aspects with colored stones are undoubtedly color and clarity, and the gems’ respective cuts should enhance and not detract from these key characteristics. In summary, a colored gemstone should be cut with proper proportions, the culet should be centered, and the stone should display minimal to no windowing or extinction (dark areas where light passes through and is not reflected back to the eye).

Some colored gemstones are now being cut with advanced technology; faceting machines that allow precise controls over the cutting of facet angles. These precision machines can yield extremely good results and require less skill from the cutter compared to traditional cutting methods. However, precision cutting will never be able to compensate for inferior materials. Fine gemstone material with an adequate grade cut will surely yield much higher results than precision cutting of gems with mediocre grade material.

From time to time, GemSelect will purchase gems that are of fine material but poorly cut. But we will only purchase such stones, if we think that they can be successfully re-cut to eliminate windowing effects and / or improve the fire and brilliance of the stone. The end results are usually excellent and better than expected, but re-cutting a stone in this manner will always incur some amount of weight loss (since the stone must be completely re-faceted). The price per carat of a re-cut gemstone will naturally be higher, but it is money well spent.

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Idocrase - Feature Gem at GemSelect




About Idocrase


Idocrase is also known as Vesuvianite, since it was originally found on the Mt. Vesuvias volcano. The name idocrase comes from the Greek for "mixed form", since its crystals often show a mixture of other mineral forms.
Idocrase has a hardness of 6.5 on the Mohs scale. The color is normally green, but also can be brown, yellow, blue or purple.
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Special Bluish Green Sapphire from GemSelect

An Amazing Special Colored Sapphire from GemSelect.

http://www.gemselect.com/sapphire/sapphire-335090.php





About Sapphire
Sapphire, with its Mohs hardness of 9, second only to diamond, is one of the most valuable and wearable of all gemstones. Famed for its brilliance and rich blue color, sapphire actually occurs in a wide range of colors, including pink, yellow and green.The name corundum comes from the ancient Sanskrit "kuruvindam", while the name "Sapphire" comes from the Persian word "safir." Sapphires are seen as the guardians of love. When given as a gift it enhances love and tunes your psyches to one another. Also, it has been used to banish envy and jealousy as well as promote fidelity in marriage.

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Colored Gemstone Clarity Grading | GemSelect

Gem dealers, jewelers and gemologists grade and evaluate colored gemstone clarities differently from that of diamonds. When it comes to colored gems like rubies, sapphires, emeralds and aquamarine, clarity standards differentiate greatly from one another. Each gem type has a unique composition, and for this reason, the colored gem grading system lacks a single universal sanction.  As many of us are aware, to apply the same diamond clarity standards to colored gems would be a mistake and it would likely result in buyers missing out on many of the finest specimens. With colored gemstones, color is the king and inclusions are tolerated, in fact for some, inclusions are revered.

Clarity plays a crucial role as one of the Four C's when grading a diamond; the remaining three are Color, Cut and Carat weight. The colored gem trade has no universal clarity grading system like GIA's International Diamond Grading System, but however, GIA does utilize a clarity ‘type’ rating system that can help consumers understand the different clarity standards based on 3 different gem types:

Type 1 Gems
Type 1 gems usually found virtually free of inclusions in the market. High quality specimens of Type 1 varieties would have only microscopic inclusions that could only be detected using a loupe with 10X magnification. So when selecting a Type 1 gemstone, a buyer should expect the stone to be near loupe-clean. Type 1 gems include gems such as aquamarine, yellow beryl, morganite, chrysoberyl, danburite, smoky quartz, kunzite, blue topaz, white zircon, blue zircon and tanzanite.

Type 2 Gems
Type 2 gems are typically found with inclusions and high quality specimens would be eye-clean, rather than almost loupe-clean as with Type 1 gemstones. Type 2 gemstones include apatite, alexandrite, corundum (sapphire and ruby), fluorite, diopside, garnet, iolite, most quartz varieties (such as ametrine and amethyst), spinel, peridot, most tourmaline colors (with the exception of green and watermelon) and red, yellow and orange zircon.

Type 3 Gems
Type 3 gems are almost always found with significant amounts of visible inclusions. Even high quality specimens will have inclusions that are visible to the naked eye. Type 3 gems include emerald, red beryl, sphalerite, benitoite, kyanite, idocrase, prehnite, sphene and watermelon and rubellite tourmaline.

These functional grading terms tell you what you can expect to see when viewing different gemstone types. They do not, however, distinguish whether a particular stone is a low or high grade specimen. For that you need to consider other attributes of the said gemstone, especially color and cut. Additionally, it should always be considered whether or not the particular gem is a high grade specimen of any specific type. The GIA clarity guidelines for colored gems can help you understand whether or not some inclusions should be expected, even with high grade colored gemstones.

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GemSelect | Gemstone Fire and Dispersion

What exactly is gemstone fire you ask?

Well, some gemstones will display flashes of color, resulting from the dispersion of white light into colors.

Diamond is very well famed for its fire, but unknown to many, a number of other gemstones are very notable for their fire as well, including demantoid garnet, sphene and zircon.


However, there is a very special gem which has even greater fire and it is unknown to most. In fact, this gem has a dispersion rating three times higher than that of diamond! This amazing gem is called sphalerite.....

Watch the Video and Witness the Fire!



GemSelect Sphalerite Gemstone from GemSelect on Vimeo.


The term "fire" in gemology, refers to the ability to split light into the colors of the spectrum. The term "scintillation", also in gemology, refers to flashes of light produced when a gem is moved in light.

Many gemstones are cut and polished in a manner featuring series of planar surfaces known as facets. The facets on the top of the gem, known as the crown, have the function of capturing light. The facets on the bottom of the stone, or the pavilion, are responsible for reflecting the light internally. This systematic process of capturing and reflecting light produces several different illuminating optical effects. In this article, we consider the optical illumination effects of fire and scintillation. We suggest reading our other articles to learn more about brilliance and luster.

As previously noted, fire refers to a gem’s ability to split light into the colors of the spectrum. The technical term used in gemology is dispersion. This phenomenal act of dispersion occurs when different light frequencies are refracted to different degrees by the refracting medium. Diamond is the most famous gemstone known for its dispersion, but several other colored gems are also notable for their impressive dispersion, sphene, demantoid garnet and zircon.

Gemologists measure a gem’s dispersion using a refractrometer. The dispersion rating is usually a numerical figure that represents the difference between violet and red refractive indices. However, it is not advisable to rely entirely on the numerical dispersion rate when it comes to predicting how much fire a gem will exhibit. Darker gemstones tend to exhibit less fire compared to lighter colored gems, and cleaner stones will also exhibit more fire than gems with many inclusions.

Scintillation refers to flashes of light produced when a gemstone is moved in light. The effect of scintillation is a result of alternating displays of reflection from polished facets of a gem. The reflections may be white or other various colors and very often they are similar tones, but brighter than the actual body tone of the gem. A blue sapphire may flash bright blue hues, but red spinel may flash bright red or even orange hues. Sometimes these flashes show a secondary hue, such as amethyst, which shows red flashes and spessartite garnet, which flashes orange and yellow.

In the gem business, here in Chanthaburi, we often overhear dealers referring to scintillation as "fire", but this usage is not really gem-o-logically correct, although it is understandable to confuse the terms. Bright flashes generated from the facets of a well-cut gem, do indeed look like fire, in gemology, fire pertains to the splitting of light into the spectral colors, which is sort of like a multi-colored scintillation.
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GemSelect: Apatite Gemstone Review and Video

A Little Background on Apatite Gems

Apatite is a gemstone that is rarely available in your local retail jewelry store, especially since it is virtually unknown to most consumers. Regardless, it is still respected and beloved by many avid gem collectors for its many unique and assorted colors and gem forms.

Since the most recent discovery and availability of a very interesting neon blue-green apatite variety, originating from Madagascar, we have been seen apatite being used in jewelry much more often.

In comparision, the best apatite specimens possess a color that can arguably rival the color of well-famed Paraiba tourmaline. Compared to tourmaline, apatite is not quite as hard, rated only a 5 on the Mohs scale of hardness. Because of this, apatite must be cut and set gently. Apatite gems should not be worn during any hard physical sports or housework in order to avoid damaging the gems. Accessories such as earrings, pendants or pins and tie tacks are generally quite safe for apatite setting, but usage in a ring should be limited to only occasional wear ring designs with protective settings, such as a bezel setting.

Caring for apatite gems is quite similar to the needs of fragile opal gemstones. Apatite is considered very sensitive to heat and shock. therefore any steamers or ultrasonic devices should be avoided at all costs.

Apatite gems are available in an assortment of yellows, as well as various shades of fantastic blues and greens. Most interestingly, some of the blue shades of apatite are known to display chatoyancy and can then be cut as cat's eyes cabochons.

The main sources for apatite are located in Brazil, India, Mozambique, Canada, and Madagascar.

Watch our Apatite Gemstone Video below.



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GemSelect: Emerald Video and Legend

Emerald Lore



Innumerable fantastic stories have grown up around this magnificent gem. The Incas and Aztecs of South America, where the best emeralds are still found today, regarded the emerald as a holy gemstone. However, probably the oldest known finds were once made near the Red Sea in Egypt.

These gemstone mines, already exploited by Egyptian pharaohs between 3000 and 1500 B.C. and later referred to as 'Cleopatra's Mines', had already been exhausted by the time they were rediscovered in the early 19th century.

Written many centuries ago, the Vedas, the holy scriptures of the Indians, say of the precious green gems and their healing properties: 'Emeralds promise good luck...' and 'The emerald enhances the well-being...'. So it is no wonder that the treasure chests of Indian maharajas and maharanis contained wonderful emeralds.

Emerald is the birthstone for those who are born in May. Emerald is the gemstone for commemorating the 20th and 35th wedding anniversaries.

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GemSelect: Topaz Myths - Video

Emerald Lore



Innumerable fantastic stories have grown up around this magnificent gem. The Incas and Aztecs of South America, where the best emeralds are still found today, regarded the emerald as a holy gemstone. However, probably the oldest known finds were once made near the Red Sea in Egypt.

These gemstone mines, already exploited by Egyptian pharaohs between 3000 and 1500 B.C. and later referred to as 'Cleopatra's Mines', had already been exhausted by the time they were rediscovered in the early 19th century.

Written many centuries ago, the Vedas, the holy scriptures of the Indians, say of the precious green gems and their healing properties: 'Emeralds promise good luck...' and 'The emerald enhances the well-being...'. So it is no wonder that the treasure chests of Indian maharajas and maharanis contained wonderful emeralds.

Emerald is the birthstone for those who are born in May. Emerald is the gemstone for commemorating the 20th and 35th wedding anniversaries.


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GemSelect Imperial Topaz

Imperial Topaz


Just hearing the very name sounds impressive, but wait until you actually see one!


The Egyptians believed that topaz was colored by the golden glow of the mighty Sun God Ra, which made topaz a very powerful amulet that protected the faithful against harmful doings. The most sought after of all natural topaz is called "Imperial Topaz".

The rich golden color of imperial topaz is typically reddish with orange overtones, and they are generally not enhanced by any kind of treatment. The most important deposit was found in Minas Gerais, Brazil. The fine golden-yellow imperial topaz is relatively scarce.

Topaz shows pleochroism, the appearance of several colors in one and the same stone, depending on the viewing angle. Colored topazes get usually a step- or scissor-cut. Due to its hardness (8 on the Mohs scale) imperial topaz is durable and qualifies for any kind of jewelry.

Topaz is a very hard gemstone but it can be split with a single blow, a trait it shares with diamond. As a result it should be protected from hard knocks.




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GemSelect Rare Hessonite Gemstones

Rare Hessonite Garnet Available Now - Daily New Arrivals




We have huge speciments of faceted hessonite garnet available now:







About Hessonite Garnet

Hessonite is an orange-brown variety of garnet popular with the Greeks and Romans for jewelry. It was also believed that hessonite illuminated the night, therefore preventing evil from harming the wearer. Garnet is also the January birthstone, and derived its name from the Latin word "granatus", meaning "like a grain." In Madagascar, hessonite is often referred to as "cinnamon stone." The color is from traces of manganese and iron.


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GemSelect Amethyst Video

Amethyst


Crystalline quartz in colors ranging from green to pale lilac to deep reddish purple and ranging from transparent to translucent is known as amethyst. Value per carat in amethyst, unlike many gems, doesn't rise exponentially with weight as it is readily available in large sizes; but depends almost entirely on color. The "Siberian" deep purple with red and blue flash commands the highest prices. Green amethyst, new to the market, is produced by heat treatment.

Watch our Violet Amethyst video below



www.gemselect.com
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GemSelect.com Blue Zircon Video Reviews

Blue Zircon


Although relatively hard, (rating 6.5-7.5 on the Mohs scale), zircon is brittle and therefore sensitive to knocks and pressure. The gem has the tendency to wear along facet edges. Its use in rings should therefore be limited to protective settings or occasional wear jewelry.

Zircon jewelry should be stored carefully, wrapped in individual twists of paper so that they will not knock against each other.

Watch our blue Zircon video below



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Cassiterite Gems | GemSelect

Cassiterite Gems

Cassiterite is a tin oxide mineral, and is the primary ore for tin. In addition to its important industrial use, it has some interesting properties that make high quality crystals valuable as gemstones.

Cassiterite is reasonably hard, with a rating on the Mohs scale of 6 to 7. It tends to be opaque though thin crystals can be translucent. Its chief virtue is its multiple crystal faces and outstanding luster. Many specimens are graded as having "adamantine" (diamond-like) or submetallic luster.

Cassiterite is one of the densest gem materials known. It also has a very high refractive index, higher than zircon, sphene and demantoid garnet.




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GemSelect.Net is Online Now: Gemstone and Jewelry Related Articles


www.GemSelect.com is pleased to introduce our new Gemstone Jewelry related articles site at www.gemselect.net.

We'll be sharing original and interesting articles on www.gemselect.net with our customers and readers covering all sorts of gemstone and jewelry related topics.

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Get Linkedin with GemSelect

GemSelect is on LinkedIn! Read our profile at http://www.linkedin.com/company/gemselect. Connect with us now on GemSelect LinkedIn.

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Shop Gems Online at www.gemselect.com

Come and view or amazing online store at http://www.gemselect.com/.  With the largest selection of gemstones available and at the absolute best prices, you'll be sure to find the best deals with GemSelect.com.

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GemSelect & Pinterest

GemSelect is on Pinterest at
http://pinterest.com/source/gemselect.com/. We welcome you to join us and view our collection of gemstone and other related pictures.

Feel free to share with us any interesting or funny picture that you may have stumbled across too.

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Follow GemSelect on Twitter

GemSelect has a new Twitter at: http://twitter.com/gemselect.

We'll post feeds to let you know when we've added new articles or pictures to any of our other social networking sites.  Our other Twitter is still open and we've dedicated this account to posting our new gemstones available.  Follow Us.

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GemSelect| Google Seller Reviews


Browse all of our Customer Reviews and Testimonials on one page.  And what better place to put them all together on than the largest Search Engine site in the world? 

Visit our Google Seller Reviews page today and view what others have to say about us and we welcome you to post your own Reviews as well:

http://www.google.com/products/seller?zmi=gemselect.com&hl=en


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GemSelect| Join Us on Pinterest!

GemSelect.com is now on Pinterest and it's already going viral!  Visit us to see some great gemstone Pins and share them with others (also found on our Twitter page too). http://pinterest.com/gemselect.

We hope you found this article interesting. Be sure to visit us on our other Social Networking sites.

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GemSelect | See our Reviews on Review Centre

"Review Centre is the UK’s largest customer review website"

"Review Centre is a community of real people, just like you, sharing their product and service experiences". Unbiased Consumer Reviews - Source: Review Centre website.

Click here to read our reviews from GemSelect.com
http://www.reviewcentre.com/reviews112051.html

www.gemselect.com

© 2005-2012 GemSelect.com all rights reserved.
Reproduction (text or graphics) without the express written consent of GemSelect.com (SETT Company Ltd.) is strictly prohibited.

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GemSelect Shopping Made Easy

Nice Article : http://newsshoppingy.blogspot.com/2009/09/gemselect-simplifies-gemstone-shopping.html

Thursday, September 3, 2009


GemSelect Simplifies Gemstone Shopping

PRLog (Press Release) – Sep 03, 2009 – GemSelect, a leading online dealer in quality gemstones, has introduced simple and powerful new search capabilities to help customers find the exact gems they need on the company's website, www.gemselect.com. GemSelect boasts one of the largest collection of loose gemstones on the internet, with more than 14,000 items in over 110 different gemstone varieties.

Colored gemstones are found in a huge variety of types, colors, shapes, cuts, sizes and quality grades. Customers place a high value on browsing a vast selection, but finding the desired items quickly and easily is a challenge. If the search tools are too complex or time-consuming, customers will revert to the slow but easy approach of paging through inventory to find their goal.

Asking a customer to fill out a complex form with all his specifications is an example of a strategy that typically fails to engage the impatient internet customer. GemSelect has taken a different approach. The customer can start with a simple choice and then progressively refine his selection as he views items that come closer to meeting his needs.

For example, the customer can start by searching all the blue gemstones. As he views all the different kinds of blue stones, he realizes that he prefers the sapphires and the kyanites. With a few clicks he can restrict his search to these two gem varieties. He can do the same with shape, size, clarity and price. He can also restrict his search to single pieces, pairs or lots. He soon defines a search result that can easily be browsed an item at a time.

The customer needn't know exactly what he wants when he begins. At each point he makes a simple choice and then is presented with product to browse. He can easily modify his search without starting over, by adding (or subtracting) colors or shapes or additional gemtypes to his current search.

Since each custom search is defined by a URL on the GemSelect website, the customer can save his search simply by bookmarking the current page. He can then return to the page on another visit and see the search results from GemSelect's constantly changing inventory. # # #
Founded in 2004, GemSelect is one of the leading online dealers in fine gemstones, specializing in sapphire, spinel, tourmaline, garnet and zircon. Based in the well-known gems center of Chanthaburi, Thailand, GemSelect sells direct from their website to customers in more than 90 countries.



www.gemselect.com

© 2005-2012 GemSelect.com all rights reserved.
Reproduction (text or graphics) without the express written consent of GemSelect.com (SETT Company Ltd.) is strictly prohibited.

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GemSelect.Com is Online Now | Shop for Gemstones


SHOP Online Now!
Precious and Semi-Precious Gems at Wholesale prices AND delivered direct to your door. It just couldn't get any easier. Order 1 gemstone or order 1000, you qualify for our wholesale savings!

One low flat-rate shipping fee. Ship as many items as you one per transaction and pay only one shipping fee!
Only at GemSelect



GemSelect.com - Join us on Twitter

Stay up to date with GemSelect's Twitter page: http://twitter.com/gemselect/ and www.gemselect.com

We post daily new arrivals and gemstone specials. Follow us and don't miss out on one-of-a-kind gemstones.

Here today, gone tomorrow!

© 2005-2012 GemSelect.com all rights reserved.
Reproduction (text or graphics) without the express written consent of GemSelect.com (SETT Company Ltd.) is strictly prohibited.
http://www.facebook.com/GemSelect
http://pinterest.com/gemselect/
http://weheartit.com/from/www.gemselect.com http://www.linkedin.com/company/gemselect
http://twitter.com/gemselect/
http://tumblr.gemselect.us
https://vimeo.com/gemselect
http://www.youtube.com/gemselectgems

http://www.gemselect.net

GemSelect is finally on Facebook


Attention Facebook Maniacs!

For those of you who haven't visited our Facebook page, please join us at: https://www.facebook.com/GemSelect.

We post awesome gemstone pics and discussions almost daily!

We hope you found this article interesting. Be sure to visit us on our other Social Networking sites.

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Happy gem hunting!
GemSelect Facebook
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GemSelect.com Reviews
Customer Reviews




GemSelect Reviews
GemSelect.com Reviews
  

Customer Reviews
GemSelect Review Centre


GemSelect | Top Customer Reviews

Liora
06-12-2012
I've narrowed by gemstone shopping websites to two excellent sites.....GEM SELECT IS TOP OF THE LIST.........MOST EXCELLENT.............will definitely continue to buy.................superb and reliable qualitywith excellent customer...

_______________________________

"Hello again. My gems (spessartite garnet and orange sapphire] arrived today and as always, are stunning. Thank you . Kind regards, "
--ML, AUSTRALIA

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READ MORE REVIEWS HERE:
http://www.bizrate.com/ratings_guide/cust_reviews__mid--259953.html

And at REVIEW CENTRE.com - http://www.reviewcentre.com/reviews112051.html

We hope you found this article interesting. Be sure to visit us on our other Social Networking sites.

Like us on Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Subscribe To Our YouTubeSubscribe To Our Vimeo
Read Our Blog
GemSelect Tumblr
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If you have any comments or suggestions just drop us a line or send us a message on any of our social sites.

Happy gem hunting!