GemSelect's Most Popular Posts

Huge Grandidierite Gemstones at GemSelect - Top 10 Rarest Gemstones!

Grandidierite


Grandidierite is a very rare collector's gemstone often referred to as one of the top 10 rarest gemstones in the world! It was named in honor of the French naturalist and an explorer of Madagascar, Alfred Grandidier. Grandidierite was first discovered in Madagascar in 1902 and then later in small quantities in other parts  of the world. Grandidierite gemstones are highly sought after after by collectors. It is rarely found in gem-quality, and faceted gemstones command extremely high prices. In fact, even abochons can fetch hundreds of dollars per carat, and for those with excellent color and clarity, it is not unheard of for cabochons to command thousands per carat.








Grandidierite gems are typically greenish-blue, blue-green or blue, with the most highly saturated neon color being the most valuable. Being a trichroic gem, grandidierite can display yellow, colorless, greenish-blue and blue under polarized light, depending on the viewing angle. The blue color is due to traces of iron, so specimens with more iron content have a higher saturation of blue.

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Happy Gem Hunting!
Derek Lee
www.GemSelect.com










Gemstone Iridescence and Shininess - Where Does it Come From?

Where Does The Magic of Iridescence Come From?

Some gemstones are known to exhibit an interesting optical phenomena known as "iridescence"; a wonderful effect that can result in a rainbow of colors caused by light diffraction and light interference. 

To learn more about iridescence, watch the wonder video below: 



We woud like to send a special thank you to our friends at Business Insider for letting us be a part of this wonder chromatic science video!

If you are interested in gemstones with iridesence, we have thousands of gems to choose from at GemSelect -- click here to view details!

GemSelect Review by Vivalatina Jewelry - TRANCHANT NICOLAS

GemSelect Customer Review and Beautiful Jewelry Designs by TRANCHANT NICOLAS

As a professional jeweler running my own online jewelry at www.vivalatina.fr, I am always looking for beautiful stones with strong colours for the jewels I propose to my clients.

I have been a client of GemSelect for years now and appreciate the quality of the stones they propose and the consideration they gave to me when I needed advice or asked for additional information.

I started working with GemSelect in September of 2013 (4 years now), so I have been able to make quite a lot of jewelry with GemSelect's stones as you can check below:

Men's Silver Bracelet with Natural Stabilized Turquoise - Sourced from GemSelect

Silver Pendant Presented with 8 Different Varieties of Gemstones - Sourced from GemSelect


Silver/Gold Ring with 9 mm Round Amethyst in Prong Setting - Sourced from GemSelect


Gold Engagement Ring with Topaz and Amethyst - Sourced from GemSelect


White Gold Ring set with two Round Blue Sapphires - Sourced from GemSelect


Silver Ring with a Turquoise Cabochon - Sourced from GemSelect


Heart Shape Red Garnets Mounted in Circular Pendants - Sourced from GemSelect


With four years working with Gemselect, I am 100% satisfied with their quality of stones and service provided. I can strongly recommend other jewelers to try working with them.

Moreover, I once had trouble with a stone that got lost in customs here in mexico, so they sent me another identical stone with no questions asked. You can't beat this kind of support.

The main assets of GemSelect for me are:
  • They offer a large range of different stones
  • For each type of gem, I can choose through a great amount of stones
  • The shipping is fast or cheap, so I can adapt the shipping cost depending on my needs
  • The support service is fast to answer when their help is required
TRANCHANT NICOLAS
gérant de la; bijouterie vivalatina
webmaster du blog; http://creation-bijoux-personnalises.fr/
Suivez nos créations via notre; Facebook; ou bien via; Pinterest

Turquoise Meanings, History and Lore - GemSelect

Turquoise: Popular Blue Green Gemstones

Turquoise is a popular colored stone often worn in gemstone cabochon rings. It has long been known by people from all over the world, from the Americas to China, from Persia to Southeast Asia. Many of the Arab countries are renowned for fine turquoise, especially the Persian region. Turquoise is also widely produced from mining areas of the Nishapur region. In Indonesia, turquoise stone is often worn by scholars. This is because the stones have origins that relate to the first state of where Islam emerged.


In addition to the Persian region, turquoise is also mined from Israel, Afghanistan, Sinai and the United States, including Nevada, California, New Mexico and Arizona. The name “Turquoise” is derived from the Hebrew word “Fairuz” and is a copper-bearing stone composed of campuran aluminum, phosphate, iron and sometimes gold. It is not the typical gemstone valued for brilliance or fire, and it lacks the shiny luster of transparent gems. However, it is the unique turquoise sky blue color that makes this stone so attractive. Turquoise exhibits a beautiful sky blue color and often forms with black spider-like webs and veins.


Turquoise can vary in color from green to blue and while some may be uni-color, others may be multicolor with unique and interesting patterns. Turquoise symbolism and lore typically involves predicting and protection against danger. Some believe turquoise can warn their owners of danger by breaking. Like malachite, turquoise can supposedly protect its wearer from falls. Changes in color of a stone presumably warn owners of an impending illness that can be prevented.

Read more about turquoise here: https://www.gemselect.com/gem-info/turquoise/turquoise-info.php
Shop Turquoise Gemstones here: https://www.gemselect.com/turquoise/turquoise.php

Jewelry Styles That Senior Fashion Influencers Love

Jewelry Styles That Senior Fashion Influencers Love



Style knows no age, and when it comes to clothing and accessories, the right ones can amp up your look, no matter if you’re 20 or 75. In recent years, the fashion world has taken notice of savvy seniors who are making bold statements with their sartorial picks, and some notable older women have even been asked to star in the latest fashion campaigns. Earlier this year, 63-year-old New York university professor Lyn Slater, known as "Accidental Icon" on Instagram, has been tapped as the face of Mango’s marketing campaign “A Story of Uniqueness”. Meanwhile, 60-year-old Gillean McLeod has been asked to model swimwear for H&M.

Older women are now getting tons of attention for the way that they style themselves as they show the world their individuality and creativity through their dress sense. Some of the most famous senior fashion influencers are also getting noticed for their jewelry, as these women have chosen to show off their collections in a unique way. These are the types of jewelry that senior fashion influencers can’t get enough of.


Chunky Turquoise Necklaces
Iris Apfel, the 95-year-old fashion icon who is well-known for her trademark oversized glasses and maximalist jewelry, has often been spotted wearing several layers of turquoise necklaces. Some of the stones are no bigger than a marble, while some are about as large as a chicken egg. Apfel recently told the UK's "The Telegraph" that her accessories help her create a variety of looks. Turquoise is a timeless gemstone that never seems to go out of fashion. Not only does turquoise make for fabulous necklaces, but it's also especially eye-catching in rings, earrings and pendants too.

Silver Earrings and Gold Wrist Cuffs
Dorrie Jacobson, an 82-year-old former Playboy Bunny turned fashion blogger, favors sharp looks that can only be described as “cool”. She complements her short, choppy haircut with a pair of thin, silver hoop earrings and a gold wrist cuff, as seen on some of her Instagram feeds. Jacobson once told "The Huffington Post" that there is no reason why older women can’t look “fabulous and contemporary”. In addition to hoop earrings, other dangling earring styles, including drop earrings and pendant earrings, are often seen in the fashion spotlight.


Oversized Earrings
Slater’s platinum bob is complemented by her favorite accessory - oversized earrings. The 63-year-old is often seen wearing red dangle earrings or shoulder-grazing hoops in a variety of colors. In one of Slater's many popular blog articles, she mentions, "I use my hair, my signature huge earrings, sunglasses, dark lips and grey hair to add an element of boldness". Although oversized earrings may be considered a bold fashion accessory, they don't always have to be over-the-top. Earrings set with large gemstones, such as black agate or onyx, can be very sleek and stylish, while remaining simple in appearance. Through clever design, oversized gemstone earrings can give a minimalist vibe while boasting a bold statement through clever design.

Bangles
Most senior fashion icons love wearing bracelets, as seen on 74-year-old fashion blogger, Judith Boyd, also known as "Style Crone". The Colorado-based blogger has a penchant for hats and often completes her look with a few bangles on one arm. Bangles are a rigid type of bracelet composed of a single material, not only in gold or silver, but also various types of gemstone materials too. Gemstone bangles are frequently made out of chalcedony or agate (quartz), but the most precious bangles are those carved from jade (nephrite or jadeite).

These senior fashion influencers believe that it is important to feel good and to wear what you like in order to look good. Though their styles are different from one another, the one thing that they have in common is their unapologetic fondness for jewelry, which they all use to great effect. Take a cue from these fashion icons and pile on the accessories the next time you dress to impress.

Replacing Missing and Lost Gemstones

Has a stone fallen out of your favorite ring or gone AWOL from your best earrings? Do not fear; replacement gemstones can be found to restore your jewelry back to its former glory. The first step to successful replacement is knowing exactly what you need, before seeking the right loose replacement stones.
Prior to searching for the right color, it is important to measure the jewelry to ascertain the size of stone that is needed. It is always best to measure in millimeters, taking the length, width and also depth, rather than buying by carat weight. Your local jeweler will be able to advise you on restoring and repairing jewelry and help you with the exact measurements of replacement stones needed. A good jeweler will be able to adjust the setting to fit a stone that is slightly off, but jewelers are not magicians!
Often times, a side stone or accent stone will fall out of jewelry leaving a gaping hole in your gorgeous bracelet. Loose accent stones are often sold as pairs or lots in ready-matched sets. This can be beneficial because you get to save the extras in case of future loss, and also the stones are already color, shape and size-matched for you, saving you some work. If missing accents are hard-to-find stones, an entire pair or set can be replaced when an exact match can’t be found.
If you are missing a center stone, be prepared to spend a little more on a replacement and search a little wider, depending on the gem type. Some stones, such as Burma ruby and Ceylon sapphire have become increasingly rare over the years and may come at much higher prices than when you first purchased the piece. However, there are always alternatives and options.
Finally, it is important to find a good color match for a replacement stone. Many are not aware that there is great variation with each gem type. For example, a ruby may be pinkish-red or deep-red with differing levels of color saturation. Matching color can be especially challenging for more than one stone, so if in doubt, feel free to ask, and we will be glad to help you treasure your precious jewels for many more years to come.

Jasper - The Stone with Personality

Jasper is a word that comes from the Greek for "mottled", "spotted" or "variegated" and true to its name, jasper gemstones have an almost infinite variety of patterns. Jasper is mostly chalcedony quartz, but up to 20% of jasper can be made up of foreign materials, or "impurities" which are responsible for its diverse appearance. Thus, jasper gemstones can be pretty much any color or pattern, masculine, feminine and everything in between.

 Jasper Gemstones from GemSelect
In an effort to “brand” jasper, certain patterns or colors have been given trade names, such as “Banded jasper” for jasper with wide bands; "scenic jasper" for stones that look like landscapes; "Orbicular jasper” for jasper with orbital concentric rings; and “Zebra jasper” for gems with black and white stripes. One trade name, however, is a misnomer. Vivid yellow and black "Bumble Bee jasper" from Indonesia is not actually jasper; but is formed from volcanic lava and sediment.

Jasper Gemstones from GemSelect
Jasper gemstones are not conventionally beautiful like some stones, such as blue Ceylon sapphire or fine pigeon’s blood rubies, yet they are appealing. Perhaps this is because jasper is a gem with personality and this is what makes it attractive. Like a lover’s gaze from across a crowded room, the “je ne sais quoi” of a certain jasper cabochon draws us in and a certain color, pattern or pleasing quality makes each stone suitable for its human “soul mate”. While the style of some gems is quite set in stone, jasper can be whatever you want it to be, wild or sedate, but always uniquely yours.

Aventurine – The Lucky Charm Gem

Everybody has heard of quartz gemstones, such as amethyst, rose quartz and citrine. However, not so many will have heard of aventurine; a light- to dark-green quartz gemstone with glittery inclusions that cause an attractive iridescence called “aventurescence”. The shimmery green color of aventurine comes from the presence of fuchsite flakes, which define aventurine as a rock rather than a mineral. Yet, aventurine is still called “quartz” because the fuchsite content is considered to be an inclusion within the mineral, silicon dioxide. Without the fuchsite, aventurine would be just colorless quartz.
 Aventurine Gemstones
Aventurine Cabochons
Fuchsite is a green variety of muscovite mica that contains chromium, making it green.  Rarely, aventurine will contain hematite or goethite, making it reddish-brown, golden brown or bluish-brown.  A man-made Italian glass called “goldstone” can be mistaken for natural aventurine, so buyers should beware. Goldstone will have a lesser hardness than true aventurine, which has a Mohs hardness of 7, so a scratch test should be able to determine the difference.
 Ruby in Fuchsite Gems
Ruby in Fuchsite Gemstones
Aventurine gemstones are most often found as carved figurines, cabochons or beads, and are popularly worn as “lucky stones”, especially green aventurine. Some say that an aventurine gemstone will even attract prosperity and improve the chances of winning the lottery! Perhaps the silvery flecks led to such lore. Other attributes attached to aventurine are the promotion of well-being, peace and positivity, as well as the alleviation of anxiety. Aventurine’s name is not associated with adventure, but was taken from the Italian words, “a” and “ventura”, meaning “by chance”. This does not refer to the possibility of lucky windfalls, but to the chance discovery of aventurine.
Carved Aventurine Elephant
Carved Aventurine Elephant
Whatever your reason for seeking out aventurine gemstones, you will not be disappointed by its serene color, glittery shimmer and affordable price, and if you happen to receive a cash prize, please be sure to let us know!

Fancy That

Fancy That!

The word, "fancy" has several dictionary definitions  and in the world of gemstones, fancy refers to something that is unusual or special, particularly, colors, cuts and shapes that are a little out of the ordinary. 

When it comes to colors, "fancy" is a color that is rare or unexpected. For example, fancy colored sapphires will not be cornflower blue and a fancy colored diamond is a diamond that is not on the traditional diamond color scale, such as a pink diamond or a vivid yellow diamond. The wide variety of gemstone types and colors allows for many fancy colored stones, including bi-colored tourmaline, color change gems and multicolored jasper gemstones.

Fancy Colored Sapphires from GemSelect
Fancy Colored Sapphires
Likewise, with regard to gemstone shapes, a fancy cut departs from the traditional. Standard shapes for cabochon-cut gems are round and ovals, where standard faceted shapes are rounds, rectangles and squares. Anything other than this may be described as "fancy", including pears, hearts and more inventive shapes, such as carvings, concave-cut gemstones and freeform shapes. 

Fancy Shaped Gemstones
Avant-garde styles push the possibilities for unique fancy gemstone jewelry even further. Thus, every gemstone and jewelry lover can easily afford to buy and wear fancy stones, whether they are non-standard colors, or cuts and shapes that depart from the traditional. It is merely a matter of personal choice rather than budget.

Natural Red, White and Blue Chalcedony - GemSelect

Rare Red, White and Blue Chalcedony Nodule - www.GemSelect.com

One of our valued customers wanted to share a discovery he made recently. The following is a write-up and photos we wanted to share with all of our GemSelect gemstone fans:

"This rare chalcedony nodule is a treasure unlike any other. This amazing creation reflects a very different world than the one we live in now, which can be seen through the geological conditions evident of the formation process

The stunning chalcedony stone exhibits a white fossil-like material on the outer shell, while the interior of the stone is dark-red on one end and zones into a pure dark-blue on the opposite end of the oblong-shaped stone. What happens in the center of this stone is truly fascinating; the blue and red come together, splitting a dime-sized circle exactly in half. Normally these inclusions would disburse throughout the stone, especially since it takes millions of years for each cryptocrystalline nodule to form. 

The origin of this stone is unknown, and the stone was acquired in a private auction this year. Our greatest hope is that this discovery will spur an interest among children all around the world. We hope this discovery will encourage others to just dig a hole in their backyard, or go down the river and kick around against the muddy banks and edges. A whole new world opens up when we engage in nature and discovery. I would like to share another one of a kind discovery with you, even though it is not a gemstone it is a gem of a discovery.

Note: The red, white and blue chalcedony stone has not been altered in any way, no treatments or enhancements at all.

P. T. Vlachos"

Here are some photos of the exciting discovery!





Gemstone Names and Variations - GemSelect

Gemstone Names and  Alias Variations

Gemstone names and terminology can be quite confusing. Often times you will come across many different gem names, just to find out later that they are one and the same.

Many names are trade names. Some are twisted by description and others have evolved from the root origins. Regardless, we thought it would be nice to compile a chart listing gemstones and the many names they are given.

Gem Type
Other Name Aliases
Mineral
Achroite
White Tourmaline
Tourmaline (Group of Silicates)
Agate
None Known
Chalcedony (Variety of Quartz)
Agate Geode
None Known
Chalcedony (Variety of Quartz)
Alexandrite
Tsar Stone, Color Change Chrysoberyl
Chrysoberyl
Almandine
Almandite
Garnet (Mineral Group)
Amazonite
Amazon Stone,  Amazonstone
Feldspar (Mineral Group)
Amber
Succinite, ambrite, resinite
Organic
Amethyst
None Known
Quartz
Ametrine
Trystine, bolivianite
Quartz
Ammolite
Ammonite, korite
Organic 
Andasulite
Chiastolite
Andalusite
Andesine
Andesine Labadorite
Feldspar (Mineral Group)
Apatite
Asparagus Stone
Apatite (Mineral Group)
Aquamarine
Blue Beryl
Beryl
Aventurine
Aventurine Quartz
Chalcedony (Variety of Quartz)
Azotic Topaz
Rainbow Topaz. Titanium Topaz, Mystic Topaz, Mystic Fire Topaz, Rainbow Fire Topaz
Topaz
Benitoite
None Known
Benitoite
Beryl
Precious Beryl (Other than Emerald & Aquamarine)
Beryl
Bixbite
Red Emerald, Red Beryl
Beryl
Black Opal
None Known
Opal Mineraloid
Bloodstone
Heliotrope, Blood Jasper
Chalcedony (Variety of Quartz)
Boulder Opal
None Known
Opal Mineraloid
Brazilianite
None Known
Brazilianite
Calcite
Limespar
Calcite
Carnelian
Cornelian
Chalcedony (Variety of Quartz)
Cassiterite
Tin Stone
Cassiterite
Cat’s Eye Apatite
None Known
Apatite (Mineral Group)
Cat’s Eye Aquamarine
None Known
Beryl
Cat’s Eye Chrysoberyl
Cymophane, Cat’s Eye
Chrysoberyl
Cat’s Eye Scapolite
None Known
Scapolite
Cat’s Eye Tourmaline
None Known
Tourmaline (Group of Silicates)
Cat’s Eye Quartz
None Known
Quartz
Cat’s Eye Sillimanite
None Known
Sillimanite
Chalcedony
None Known (Bluish-White-Gray Variety)
Chalcedony (Variety of Quartz)
Charoite
None Known
Charoite
Chocolate Opal
None Known
Opal
Chrome Diopside
Russian Chrome Diopside, Green Diopside
Diopside
Chrome Tourmaline
Chrome dravite
Tourmaline
Chrysoberyl
Alumoberyl, Chrysberil, Chrysoberil, Chrysopal, Delamétherie, Crisoberilo, Krysoberril, Oriental Chrysolite Pacific
Chrysoberyl
Chrysocolla
None Known
Chrysocolla
Chrysoprase
Chrysophrase, chrysoprasus
Chalcedony (Variety of Quartz)
Citrine
Success stone, Merchant’s stone
Quartz
Clinohumite
None Known
Clinohumite
Color-Change Diaspore
None Known
Diaspore
Color-Change Garnet
None Known
Garnet Group
Color-Change Sapphire
None Known
Corundum
Coral
Precious Coral
Organic
Danburite
None Known
Danburite
Demantoid Garnet
Green Andradite
Andradite
Dendritic Agate
Mocha Stone
Chalcedony (Variety of Quartz)
Diamond
None Known
Diamond
Dumortierite Quartz
None Known
Quartz
Emerald
Green Beryl
Beryl
Fire Agate
None Known
Chalcedony (Variety of Quartz)
Fire Opal
Jelly Opal
Opal Mineraloid
Fluorite
Fluorspar
Fluorite
Goshenite
White Beryl, Colorless Beryl
Beryl
Grossular Garnet
Grossularite Garnet
Grossular
Hematite
Haematite
Hematite
Hemimorphite
Calamine
Hemimorphite
Hessonite Garnet
Cinnamon Stone
Grossular 
Hiddenite
Green Spodumene
Spodumene
Howlite
White Turquoise, White Buffalo Stone
Howlite
Idocrase
Vesuvianite
Idocrase
Imperial Topaz
None Known
Topaz
Iolite
Cordierite, Dichroite
Cordierite
Jade
Jadeite, Nephrite
Jadeite or Nephrite
Jasper
None Known
Chalcedony (Variety of Quartz)
Kunzite
Pink Spodumene
Spodumene
Kyanite
Disthene
Kyanite
Labradorite
None Known
Labradorite
Lapis Lazuli
Lapis
Lazurite
Larimar
Stefilia's Stone, Blue Pectolite
Pectolite
Lepidolite
Lilalite
Lepidolite
Malachite
None Known
Malachite
Malaya Garnet
Malaia
Pyrope / Spessartite
Mali Garnet
Grandite
Grossular / Andradite
Maw-sit-Sit
Jade Albite, Chloromelanite
Jade-Albite
Melanite
titanian andradite
Andradite
Moonstone
Hecatolite, selenite
Feldspar (Mineral Group)
Morganite
Pink Beryl, Salmon Beryl
Beryl
Mystic Quartz
Mystic Fire Quartz, Azotic Quartz, Rainbow Mystic Quartz, Rainbow Fire Quartz
Quartz
Mystic Topaz
Fire Topaz, Mystic Fire Topaz, Rainbow Topaz, Rainbow Fire Topaz, Caribbean Topaz, Bermuda Topaz
Topaz
Obsidian
None Known
Obsidian (Mineraloid)
Onyx
None Known
Chalcedony (Variety of Quartz)
Opal
None Known
Opal (Mineraloid)
Opal Doublet
None Known
Opal (Mineraloid)
Pearl
Precious Pearl
Pearl
Peridot
Chrysolite, Olivine
Olivine
Pietersite
Tempest Stone
Riebeckite
Prehnite
None Known
Prehnite
Pyrite
Fool’s Gold
Pyrite
Pyrope Garnet
Bohemian Garnet, Chrome Pyrope
Pyrope
Quartz
None Known
Quartz
Rainbow Moonstone
Hecatolite, Selenite
Feldspar (Mineral Group)
Rhodochrosite
Manganese Spar, Raspberry Spar
Rhodochrosite
Rhodolite Garnet
None Known
Almandine-Pyrope
Rock Crystal
Clear Quartz, Pure Quartz, Colorless Quartz
Quartz
Rose Quartz
Pink Quartz
Quartz
Ruby
Red Corrundum
Corundum
Ruby-Zoisite
Anyolite
Corrundum-Zoisite
Rutile Quartz
Sagenite, Venus-Hair Stone

Quartz-Rutile
Rutile Topaz
None Known
Topaz-Rutile
Sapphire
Corrundum
Corundum
Sardonyx
Sard
Chalcedony (Variety of Quartz)
Seraphinite
Clinochlore
Chlorite (Mineral Group)
Serpentine
Bastite, Bowenite, Connemara, Verd-Antique and Williamsite
Serpentine Group
Smithsonite
Bonamite
Smithsonite
Smoky Quartz
Brown Quartz, Smoky Quartz
Quartz
Snowflake Obsidian
None Known
Obsidian (Mineraloid)
Sodalite
None Known
Sodalite
Spessartite Garnet
Spessartine
Spessartite
Sphalerite
Zinc Blende
Sphalerite
Sphene
Titanite
Titanite
Spinel
None Known
Spinel
Spodumene
Yellow Kunzite
Spodumene
Star Diopside
Black Diopside, Black Star Diopside, Crying Stone
Diopside
Star Garnet
None Known
Garnet
Star Moonstone
None Known
Feldspar (Mineral Group)
Star Rose Quartz
None Known
Quartz
Star Ruby
None Known
Corundum
Star Sapphire
None Known
Corundum
Star Sunstone
None Known
Feldspar (Mineral Group)
Sugilite
Sugalite, Luvulite
Sugilite
Sunstone
Aventurine Feldspar, heliolite
Feldspar (Mineral Group)
Tanzanite
Blue Zoisite
Zoisite
Tiger’s Eye
Tiger Eye, Tigers Eye
Chalcedony (Variety of Quartz)
Topaz
Precious Topaz
Topaz
Tourmaline
None Known
Tourmaline Group
Tsavorite Garnet
Tsavolite
Grossularite
Turquoise
None Known
Turquoise
Variscite
Utahlite
Variscite
Zircon
Starlight, Jargon, Hyacinth, Matura Diamond
Zircon

This chart will likely be out of date over time, so if you have anything you would like us to add or update, please send us a message at help@gemselect.com.

http://www.GemSelect.com